Epifanio
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Eestikeelsed artiklid EDITORIAL

EDITORIAL

EPIFANIO RECOMMENDS

INTERVIEW WITH CHRISTOPHER ORR
August Künnapu

INTERVIEW WITH
CHI TI-NAN

Vilen Künnapu

THE LOST WORLD OF MAYA
Mathura

HARRY PYE’s POSTCARD FROM LONDON
Harry Pye

TO SEE NAPLES AND DIE...
Mehis Heinsaar

OCTAGONAL FOUNTAIN
Vilen Künnapu

TEAM

Cover No8Before writing the editor’s column, I listened to the ska-group “The Toasters” song “The Stage”:

“This whole world is a stage
and everyone is playing their part.
Even the children play their part.
Right now I am playing my part,
singing and dancing
for you to join in with me”

I am holding the first edition of Epifanio and the script of the eighth one in my hands, and it feels like we have come full circle. The opening number portrayed the kaleidoscope of urban culture: Taipei, Paide, Perm, East-London, Istanbul, Budapest, Amsterdam, Tallinn and Tallinn Prison, from where Andrus Elbing, the poet-behind-bars, sent his rhyming messages. Elbing is out of jail now and reports in his essay “Life on this side of the bars” how the real moments take place within, whether you are on this side of the bars or the other.

The new edition echoes of various world cultures. There is an interview with a metaphysical Scottish painter Christopher Orr and a Chinese architect-mystic Chi Ti-Nan. Mathura brings to us his experiences of the understudied Mayan cultural heritage on his journey through Guatemala. The Mayan calendar ends on December 21st, 2012, and only the wind knows whether it signifies the new coming of the Mayan civilization or something else. Kiwa presents the ideas he thought of, when visiting Nepal and India. Heie Treier gives an account of her spatial observations in the Esherick House and Vanna Venturi House (a house for the architect’s mother) – two private houses on the same street in Philadelphia, designed by Louis Kahn and his student Robert Venturi.
Harry Pye sends a postcard from the Elephant & Castle  – a run-down and out of shape area in South-London that hasn’t lost its charm. Mehis Heinsaar condenses the Italian siesta life-style into his essay about Naples, and notes that he still prefers to sit in the heated room in Tartu looking at the bullfinches in February weather. Leena Torim writes about her enduring attraction to moss, and Aive Mets about her suitcase library. Vilen Künnapu sits on the edge of an octagonal fountain and tells a story of a mental journey through the brightest memories of childhood into current reality.

Veiko Õunpuu reviews the pearls of his spontaneous movie collection and also talks about the video-tapes and dii-vuu-diis, which he is boot-lessly trying to place on the boots of his guests hoping that they would take them away. Andri Luup reasons on the necessity to communicate in the mother-tongue, based on his experience with Estonians and Finns, when making a movie “Kinnunen”. I would agree that one shouldn’t express his feelings in the languages of the world, unless he/she was able to think in that language. Mohandas K. Gandhi has said: “Happiness is when your thoughts, words and actions speak the same language.”

August Künnapu / editor

 

 

Photo: Aive Mets