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EDITORIAL

EPIFANIO RECOMMENDS

CULT MOVIES AND ME
Benedict Chapman

INTERVIEW WITH HELGA NÕU
August Künnapu

THE FAKE HORSE
Helga Nõu

INTERVIEW WITH FREDRIK LAVIK, A SPECIALIST IN EAST AFRICAN MUSIC
Martin Jõela

8 QUESTIONS TO MR JOHN PETER ASKEW
Harry Pye

SPATIAL POETRY IN 2019
Vilem Künnapu

PANHUMANISM MANIFESTO
Alexey Levchuk

PAINTINGS OF ANU MUISTE

TEAM

Nr 17 kaas In summer 2005 I was putting together the second issue of Epifanio – Essentiality special. I turned to Mati Unt and asked him to write about the essence of literature. He agreed at once and said he needed three weeks. Three weeks later his wife Lii Unt got in touch with me and announced that Mati was no longer with us. I am sure that before passing over, he reflected on that theme.

In the current issue I interviewed our good neighbour Helga Nõu, who began her writer’s career in Sweden and was inspired by Mati Unt. I regard Helga as one of the most fascinating writers on this and the other side of the Baltic Sea. Helga compares the essence of literature with other creative fields, shares her habits of writing and painting, contrasts the writing of a novel and a short story, and describes how it feels to live 75 years later in the same flat, from where she fled as a child to the West during the war. Helga has this advice to Epifanio’s readers interested in writing:

“...I would also like to mention the absurd. A writer depicts a scene, characters and the situation as well as he or she can. He uses all the necessary words, but something seems missing. In such a case I am not afraid to use the absurd, which solves all problems and sends the difficulties packing. It is very simple, like the secret word “sim-sala-bimm”. Try it!”

The issue also presents Helga Nõu’s amusing short story “The Fake Horse”, which tells about the fading Estonian language skills of her grandchildren.

Martin Jõela interviews his Norwegian colleague Fredrik Lavik, who talks about his company Afro7, mainly recording the fascinating music of the eastern coast countries in Africa. Africa – the homeland of music, after all.

Harry Pye puts questions to his English pal John Peter Askew, who recently published a playful book of photographs “We” – in the course of twenty years the author took pictures of a simple family in Perm. “My work stems from a belief in the importance of tenderness and kindness in our interactions with the world, coupled with political conviction that we can create a better one”, is the life philosophy of the artist.

The artist-architect Alexey Levchuk from St Petersburg presents a futurist manifesto, accompanied by his sensitive paintings.

The 17th Epifanio issue also introduces the mysterious paintings of Anu Muiste who discovered painting only recently.

On the initiative of Peeter Sauter we started a new column, “Diary of an Artist”, where artists from different fields keep a diary for at least one month. The opening column is from sculptor Silja Truus who resided in London for a long time. She is now in Tartu and compares the zest and vigour of life in a big and small city. In summer, Peeter visited Silja’s exhibition in Viinistu Art Museum’s barrel gallery and had a chat with her.

“Diary of a Writer”, on the other hand, offers thoughts about demons from Mehis Heinsaar who has kept a diary for thirteen years:

“…At the same time it is funny that despite the triumph of technology and science, contemporary world is still depicting the demons, phantasms and ghosts as medieval, primitive monsters, not once thinking that they, too, may change, develop and improve themselves along with human consciousness and technological development. That they may sneak into computers and engines, that they may have wormed their way in and settled namely in the brains of top scientists, who are making a huge and constant effort in order to invent the most perfect human robot, new bacteria and pest controls, new vaccines, new rockets, new chainsaws, new fertilisers, faster cars or a virus that would be able to destroy the entire continent.”

August Künnapu

Vilen Künnapu writes about poetic spaces in Havana, St Petersburg and Los Angeles. He concludes that “I personally think that we create our spaces ourselves, with god’s help. And we make them how we like them. If you want to be happy then be happy. If you want to be depressed, go ahead. We get to the point when spaces are in our head. My space is poetic, jolly, colourful, funny. Nothing bad can happen there, and nothing will.” What is your space like, dear reader?

August Künnapu / editor

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Photo: Fred-Erik kerner