Epifanio
Epifanio 1 Epifano 2 Epifanio 3 Epifano 4 Epifanio 5 Epifanio 6 Epifanio 7 Epifanio 8 Epifanio nr 9 Epifanio nr 10 Epifanio nr 11 Epifanio 12
Epifanio 13 Epifanio 14 Epifanio 15 Epifanio 16 Epifanio 17              
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EDITORIAL

EPIFANIO RECOMMENDS

RARITIES IN MY RECORD COLLECTION
Rhythm Doctor

A FEW WORDS ABOUT DIGITAL GRAPHICS OF SINDY ILVES

FIELDS AND OPPORTUNITIES
Mait Vaik

PORTRAIT OF AN ARTIST. JUKA KÄÄRMANN
Mehis Heinsaar

INTERVEW WITH JÜRGEN-KRISTOFFER KORSTNIK
August Künnapu

SHAKING OFF THE SHACKLES OF PREJUDICES IN ART
Vilen Künnapu

LIFE AND WORK OF KALJO SIMSON
Helen Kooviste

INTERVIEW WITH JAMES JOHNSTON
Harry Pye

TEAM

RARITIES IN MY Record Collection

Record rarities

What makes a record rare? Is it only the value or is it simply the scarcity of copies?

I guess a fair few records in my collection of 15,000 + would be classified as rare, so here I have chosen records that are yes, rare & valuable but most importantly records that have special qualities & mean a lot me.

The most valuable record I currently own is probably ‘’Stay in the Groove’’ by the Soul Dynamics. It was released in 1970 on the highly collectable & beautifully designed record label “Wand”, out of New York City. Five minutes of raw funk power spread over 2 sides of a 7 inch single. Even though it sells for several hundred dollars, 99% of the copies would be considered faulty as the sound is overloaded & distorted, but this has little impact on it’s value as it’s such a fantastic record! It was recorded at the world famous Sigma Sound Studio in NYC, but the band & authors are some what of a mystery, one off wonders.

A 10 inch acetate, by Silent Phase is quite a treasure in my collection, there are less than 5 in existence. What also makes it special is that it was given to me by Transmat record label owner, Derrick May. To make it even more special the sleeve bears Derrick’s signature plus a sketch of a dancing figure by him. The record itself contains 2 superb cuts of deep Detroit techno from producer Stacey Pullen which remain unreleased to the general public. An acetate is produced by cutting directly from lathe to a laquer coated metal disc & the surface is relatively soft. It is meant to be used as reference & can withstand only a few DJ plays.

“Jamaican Party Time” is a wonderful collection from the late 1950’s & early 1960’s, which I have on the original Jamaican pressing. As it says on the sleeve “This is an unusual album. Never before has there been such an array of popular Jamaican artists & musicians performing on the same disc”. What you hear are extremely rare recordings of some of the very best Jamaican jazz musicians, Ernest Ranglin, Baba Motto, Bertie King & Byron Lee. The songs “Solas Market”, “Come Back Lisa” & “Mango Walk” are exceptional examples of Mento, a form of Calypso unique to Jamaica. The primitive sleeve design is also a thing of beauty.

Another scarce & special record I own is a promotional copy of The Elohim’s “Back Together”. In London in 1992 I was lucky enough to be given 1 of the five copies pressed by the artist & producer I know only as Femi. It is a profound, dynamic & timeless piece of house music. An acoustic bass sound, raw drums & percussion propel the song as Femi sings & hums along, interrupted by crashing gongs & a cutting organ riff. It’s not listed or published anywhere on the internet so I recently uploaded some excerpts on Soundcloud for people to enjoy.

Maya Angelou is most famous for her poetry & civil rights work, not many people are aware that she recorded an album of Calypso music, in Hollywood in 1956. I have the original British pressing which I found in 1978, in the same store & on the same day as the “Jamaican Party Time” LP, in the town of Coventry where I was studying Fine Art. It sounds special because the accompaniment highlights Maya’s distinctive voice & timbre with minimal backing of just guitar & african percussion. It’s a unique recording in it’s own right, never mind that it’s Maya Angelou singing!

Rhythm Doctor

 

I have been buying records since 1964 when I used my pocket money to buy “Glad All Over” by The Dave Clark Five. A few years later I began selecting the records for the local youth club & then in 1978 when I went to study Fine Art in Coventry I decided to call myself a DJ as the music on offer at student events was not to my taste. That’s where the Rhythm Doctor was born. I’m very happy to still be doing what I love in 2018.

RHYTHM DOCTOR
https://www.mixcloud.com/rhythmdr
https://soundcloud.com/rhythmdr
Photo: Anu Samarüütel