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Eestikeelsed artiklid EDITORIAL

EDITORIAL

EPIFANIO RECOMMENDS

MY RECORD COLLECTION
Mark Young

IN MUNTINLUPA PRISON
August Künnapu

A FEW WORDS ABOUT THE LATEST DEVELOPMENTS IN LATVIAN PAINTING
Maija Rudovska

IMPRESSIONS OF NEPAL
Vilen Künnapu

THE TWO TOWNS: A TRANSFORMATION OF TOWNSCAPE IN MODERN CHINA
Peteris Ratas

HARRY PYE'S POSTCARD FROM LEEDS
Harry Pye

LEO GIDON'S WANDERING MIND
Mehis Heinsaar

ANTONIO MACHADO
Lauri Sommer

TEAM


Cover No9Epifanio’s jubilee issue arrives at the time, when capitalism is slowly starting to recede and spirituality is making its come-back. The reflection of it flickers on the following pages also.

In October and November last year I was artist-in-residence in the Philippines. One of the most fascinating events that took place there was a self-portrait workshop in Muntinlupa Prison, that we led together with my desk mate Tim Kolk. The inmates did a good job portraying their souls on paper. Young Latvian art historian Maija Rudovska writes about modern Latvian painting that has not been discussed or described much in Estonia. It is more introspective than outward looking. Eve Arpo and Riin Kranna-Rõõs open the backstage of the art action “Day Without Mobiles” event in Tallinn, Edmonton and Sao Paulo. Leena Torim tells of the white and fluffy snow, which in the far north is a popular building material. Vilen Künnapu recounts his life journey to Nepal, and his meetings with stupas and elephants along the way. Latvian architect Peteris Ratas compares two Chinese towns: a neglected, yet virile workers town – 50 year-old Weidong, and pseudo-modern Thames Town, copied and built up a few years ago by the example of historical British towns Bath and Bristol, which leaves you feeling blank and deserted.

Harry Pye sends a postcard from one of the biggest English towns, Leeds, which is animated by a rather substantial art life. Mehis Heinsaar writes a short story about professor Leo Gidon, whose mind takes a hike, as a result of which his Paleolithic doctoral thesis acquires a more poetic form. Lauri Sommer has translated and commented on the melancholy yet deeply sentient poetry of a Spanish poet Antonio Machado. Andri Luup gives an account of how the originally white movie screen has been painted pitch black with the dark topics and desolation of the film world in the face of economic depression. Mart Aas depicts his short visit to Slovenia’s little town Piran with beautiful architecture, but nothing going on in the art scene. He suggests a new celebration – culture free day every year on November 20th (it is a pun of numbers, because Tallinn and Turku have been elected the European cultural capitals for 2011), when all cultural establishments would be closed and no creative projects happening. I believe this idea could help people get closer to culture, seeing it more as a natural human activity rather than an UFO movement.

The world is made up of signs, which we are given in both dreaming and waking life. Robert Moss writes in Conscious Dreaming thus:

“The Greeks of Pharos knew that signs of prophecy are all around us – you can see them in the flight of birds, accidental meetings, words you caught from strangers’ dialogue on the street. The world speaks to us in many voices, dreamlike. These voices may resemble a cacophony, because we tend to leave out those messages that do not follow life’s linear logic and continuance. You have more chances to gather the information from the world and your dreams, when you are able to create a framework for synchronicities, which would bring events into better focus. The best way to do this (like the citizens of Pharos knew, when they whispered into God’s ear) is to form a question that you need an immediate answer to. Quite likely, this answer is the same that your dreams are trying to convey to you.”

 

August Künnapu / editor

Photo: Aive Mets